Invisible Man #Twittermission Round-Up

by:  Thom Dunn at 01/31/2013

Our inaugural #Twittermission took place on the evening of January 30. The Twitterverse was buzzing with excitement when we announced the event, and there were many people following closesly as I communicated over video chat with Invisible Man projection designer Alex Koch and costume designer Kathleen Geldard and relayed their answers to audience questions live over our twitter feed, which was then displayed on the video monitors in the lobby during intermission. While much of the in-house audience seemed busy/distracted with concessions and bathroom runs, the video monitors still drew several curious eyes who watched with interest. With a little more leadtime to promote the event for A Raisin In The Sun, we're hoping to get our audiences - both those at the theatre, and those at home -even more involved in the #Twittermission conversation.

The conversation remains on our Twitter feed, of course, but for the sake of posterity, here are the tweets as they took place last night. (for those unfamiliar with twitter shorthand, @diveunderwater is Alex Koch)

Intermission 1

  1. We'll tweet out a Q first, followed by the A. "AK" is a Q for Alex Koch, "KG" is a Q for Kathleen Geldard. 
  1. Kathleen Re: wigs "3 for Julia, 2 for Deirdre, 1 for Joy." 
  1. AK: What do you use for software / editing? 
  1. .: "Final Cut Pro, After Effects, Photoshop, Isadora, and a lot of tracking in Filemaker. Mas OS X" 
  1. .: "I do the math w/ a draftsman, we look at limitations of equipment and push 'em for all they're worth!"
  1. AK: How did the projections change between theatres? 
  1. .: "The shape of the Court & Studio was quite different, no one saw the whole picture, had to shift images for perspective."
  1. AK: How did you learn about doing projection? 
  1. .: "Made it up as I went along. Started making gallery installations, performance element came next."
  1. AK: What is your favorite projected moment in the show? 
  1. .: "I love the hospital (electroshock), it's a total blow-out of effects. Feels good to let go of restraint." 
  1. AK: Do you handle the actual setting / arrangement of the projectors?  
  1. .: "With set designer we decide what we want to paint w/ projections, lens math tells us where they go."
  1. That's all for now. Don't forget to ask your questions, and we'll be back in about 45 minutes at the end of the act for  2!

Intermission 2

 

  1. Time for  part 2! Remember to send us your questions (and thanks again to !) 
  1. KG: How many quick changes are there (and are any projections used to cover quick changes?)  
  1. Kathleen: "Many many quick changes, but the changes happen during dialog."  
  1. AK: Where do you find the images and video? Did you gather it all by yourself?   
  1. .: "I led a team of 4. We started at National Archives, a FREE resource. Almost everything is open source!"
  1. KG: What changed between theatres (Court in Chicago to DC to the )? 
  1. Kathleen: "Parts of costume design were heightened from DC to here, mostly due to change in audience distance." (1/2)
  1. Kathleen: "One more notable change from last production is Woman In Red's dress and red undergarments."  (2/2)
  1. AK: How did projections change between theatres?  
  1. .: "Shape of Court & Studio was quite different, had to shift images based on audience perspective." 
  1. And the most important  Question of the night for Cambridge expat , or Yankees?
  1. Ladies and gentlemen, you can all rest easy this : is indeed still a  fan!

 

  1. Thank you again for joining us on our  experiment, and have a good night!

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About me

Thom Dunn is the Web & New Media Manager at the Huntington, meaning it's his job to play around on the Internet and make things cool. He handles all of the video content and social media as well, and has the biggest computer monitor in the office. Like, ginormous.

Outside of the Huntington, Thom is a writer, musician, and homebrewer. It's all pretty cool. You can find out more about it at thomdunn.net.

 
 

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