A Dispatch From Good People Rehearsall

by:  Melanie Garber, Assistant to the Director at 08/29/2012

Rehearsals began last Tuesday for our production of David Lindsay-Abaire’s Good People. The magic from page to stage is particularly poignant this time around because we have a local story (Southie native Margie, played by Johanna Day, is our protagonist) being told by actual locals (actors Karen MacDonald and Nancy E. Carroll and director Kate Whoriskey, to name a few). 

In keeping with this focus on local authenticity, we've had a lot of discussion at the table where we can pull our inspiration from to perfect the Boston accent and attitude. We've talked about going out into the city and observing first hand, as well as drawing on movies like The Departed and Gone Baby Gone.

There is also a continuous effort to stay true to the pacing of the language. For example, deciding when these characters have forethought versus when they plow ahead with unfiltered reaction in the heat of the moment keeps cropping up as we muck about in rehearsal. The juxtaposition of playing these two elements adds a humor and sincerity to the performances that’s already paying off as we rounded out our first week together on Sunday.

Until next week...

Comments

  1. , I found Scott less good with the underpinning threoy; he has a tendency to make a few too many assumptions and is a bit too loose with the generalisations. This isn't necessarily a bad thing in itself, as it can make the writing `pacy' and accessible. However, I would certainly take issue with the way he defines marketing. It's a pretty one-eyed view, and to make matters worse its advertising he focuses on in the list he draws up detailing its shortcomings. At the best of times resorting to `man of straw' arguments is dubious rhetoric, and initially this made me doubt the book's `authenticity' or thought leadership, as Scott would perhaps call it. I would also argue that `interruption advertising' still has its place both of itself and when integrated into Web-based strategies. The creative variations of Cadbury's `Gorilla' advertisement on YouTube offer an intriguing insight to what can be achieved. The issue I have with Scott's book is, that to begin, he is so concerned to argue the old marketing and PR rules are dead, that he dilutes the message about how the old and the new might be better integrated to deliver more effective communications, at whatever level of access. But by the end of the book, his more measured, thoughtful and practical approach had turned me around. For me, Scott sums up his book in the following statement. The new publishing model on the Web is about. . . delivering content when and where it is needed and, in the process, branding you or your organization as a leader. When you understand your audience, those people who will become your buyers, you can craft an editorial and content strategy just for them. . . . In order to implement a successful strategy, think like a publisher. Two final comments: understanding your audience is classic, `old marketing'. Secondly, thinking like a publisher is not exactly easy, but it's what conventional PR attempts to achieve when crafting messages for its audiences. So, let's be careful not throw out the baby with the bath water. Help other customers find the most helpful reviewsa0Was this review helpful to you?a0 | a0
  2. I asked for this for christmas and love it. Its got thgnis to make and do and plenty of traditional games and stuff that my mums says she used to do and had forgotten about(but she's not that old!) A lot of it is good cheap fun a great alternative to computer games. Not too sure about the excuses for being late to school though!( like helping little bow peep find her sheep, my teachers wouldnt believe that)however some bits are just for fun so don't take it so seriously but some bits are helpful too. Am i the best at everything yet? Of course im a girl!!!

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